Author: Hartung, W.
Paper Title Page
MOOFAV10 Completion of FRIB Superconducting Linac and Phased Beam Commissioning 197
 
  • T. Xu, Y. Al-Mahmoud, H. Ao, J. Asciutto, B. Bird, J. Bonofiglio, B. Bullock, N.K. Bultman, F. Casagrande, W. Chang, Y. Choi, C. Compton, J.C. Curtin, K.D. Davidson, K. Elliott, A. Facco, V. Ganni, A. Ganshyn, J. Gao, P.E. Gibson, Y. Hao, W. Hartung, N.M. Hasan, L. Hodges, K. Holland, J.D. Hulbert, M. Ikegami, T. Kanemura, S.H. Kim, P. Knudsen, Z. Li, S.M. Lidia, G. Machicoane, C. Magsig, P.E. Manwiller, F. Marti, T. Maruta, K.E. McGee, E.S. Metzgar, S.J. Miller, D.G. Morris, H. Nguyen, P.N. Ostroumov, A.S. Plastun, J.T. Popielarski, L. Popielarski, X. Rao, M.A. Reaume, H.T. Ren, K. Saito, M. Shuptar, A. Stolz, A. Taylor, B.P. Tousignant, A.D.F. Victory, D.R. Victory, J. Wei, E.M. Wellman, J.D. Wenstrom, Y. Yamazaki, C. Zhang, Q. Zhao, S. Zhao
    FRIB, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
  • K. Hosoyama
    KEK, Ibaraki, Japan
  • M.P. Kelly
    ANL, Lemont, Illinois, USA
  • R.E. Laxdal
    TRIUMF, Vancouver, Canada
  • M. Wiseman
    JLab, Newport News, Virginia, USA
 
  Funding: This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science under Cooperative Agreement DE-SC0000661.
The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is an ac-celerator-based facility funded by the US Department of Energy for nuclear physics research. FRIB is nearing the end of technical construction, with first user beams ex-pected in Summer 2022. Key features are the delivery of a variety of rare isotopes with a beam energy of ’ 200 MeV/u and a beam power of up to 400 kW. The facility is upgradable to 400 MeV/u and multi-user capability. The FRIB driver linac consists of 324 superconducting resonators and 69 superconducting solenoids in 46 cry-omodules. FRIB is the first linac to deploy a large number of HWRs (220) and the first heavy ion linac to operate at 2 K. We report on the completion of production and in-stallation of the FRIB cryomodules and phased beam commissioning results.
 
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2021-MOOFAV10  
About • Received ※ 12 August 2021 — Revised ※ 16 August 2021 — Accepted ※ 21 August 2021 — Issue date ※ 04 May 2022
Cite • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
WEPTEV011 Development of In-Situ Plasma Cleaning for the FRIB SRF Linac 657
 
  • C. Zhang, W. Chang, K. Elliott, W. Hartung, S.H. Kim, J.T. Popielarski, K. Saito, T. Xu
    FRIB, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
 
  Development of techniques for in-situ plasma cleaning of quarter-wave and half-wave resonator cryomodules is underway at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University. If SRF cavity performance degradation is seen during future FRIB linac operation, in-situ plasma cleaning may help to restore performance without disassembly of the cavities from the cryomodules for off-line cleaning. A plasma cleaning feasibility study for FRIB cryomodules indicates that plasma cleaning can be done on-line without modifications to the RF couplers or cryomodules. Initial bench measurements have been performed on a FRIB half-wave resonator using noble gases (Ne, Ar), with and without added oxygen gas. The plasma ignition threshold has been measured as a function of gas pressure and composition. Studies of plasma cleaning efficacy are underway. Results will be presented.  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2021-WEPTEV011  
About • Received ※ 04 July 2021 — Revised ※ 08 November 2021 — Accepted ※ 24 December 2021 — Issue date ※ 01 March 2022
Cite • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)  
 
THPTEV002 Enhanced Pneumatic Tuner Control for FRIB Half-Wave Resonators 829
 
  • W. Chang, W. Hartung, S.H. Kim, J.T. Popielarski, T. Xu, C. Zhang, S. Zhao
    FRIB, East Lansing, Michigan, USA
 
  The superconducting driver linac for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) includes a total of 46 cryomodules; 31 cryomodules contain half-wave resonators (HWRs) with pneumatic tuners. Pneumatic tuner control is via solenoid valves connecting the tuner to a helium gas supply manifold and a gas return line. For precise compensation of cavity detuning over a small range, the control voltage for the solenoid valves must be calibrated. Some valves have hysteresis in the gas flow rate as a function of control voltage, such that their response may be nonlinear and not repeatable–this makes the control algorithm challenging. To improve the system performance, a new pneumatic tuner control system was developed which regulates the position of one stepper motor instead of the two solenoid valves.  
poster icon Poster THPTEV002 [1.321 MB]  
DOI • reference for this paper ※ https://doi.org/10.18429/JACoW-SRF2021-THPTEV002  
About • Received ※ 24 June 2021 — Revised ※ 15 December 2021 — Accepted ※ 17 February 2022 — Issue date ※ 16 May 2022
Cite • reference for this paper using ※ BibTeX, ※ LaTeX, ※ Text/Word, ※ RIS, ※ EndNote (xml)